Wednesday, September 29, 2010

On being hypocritical ...

Just down the road from us, about 5 minutes by car or 25 minutes on foot, is a Presbyterian church.

This one is notable for the fact that it originally resided some distance from its present location. I also consider it somewhat notable for its advertising. So it was two weeks ago when I drove past, in a somewhat foul humour and saw their latest offering. Regrettably, I missed getting a photo (no, you do not need to know why) of the sign in question but it rang a very loud bell when I saw it.

It read -
God does not discriminate.

Religions do.


Now think about that for a moment. If you can not pick where I am about to go, then perhaps take a few minuites out to read the opening pages of the Gita (as a purely independent source) which says at some length what St Columba's has condensed to two lines.

I had the minor misfortune to trip over this wally who would (very likely) agree with the sentiment of the sign. Just as long, you understand, that it applies solely to Islam. I suspect that there would be quite a number of past visitors to these pages who would agree with the patriotism (and that is both nation and religion patriotism to which I refer) of the gent from Chowan River.

Pointing out the application of St Columba's general statement to the opposite would be totally futile.

3 comments:

Eugene Tan said...

I've seen those two lines quite a number of times as well.

I don't want to go down that discussion path with you at the end of it. That I am actually already waiting there *with* is probably a more accurate statement.

But yes, I know where you are coming from. And yes, I know the irony of it all.

The probligo said...

Even more, Eugene, there are others who would agree with the fundamental sentiment and then start finding "exceptions" to support their interpretation of the "rule".

'Tis sad, really. If only...

Monkfish said...

Interesting how churches advertise their wares. Or that indeed they need to.

Personally, when a huge finger points down from the sky and a voice booms out to get my arse into church pronto, I might - only might, given my tendency to rationalism - be inclined to take notice.

Otherwise I ignore signs outside churches, particularly when they have some half-brained wally of an advertising agent contracted to come up with what they think is a smart and pithy ad.

Thus end up the noble sentiments expressed by Christ, who no doubt would strike the signs down had he been around to see them.